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16 years ago
This article reports some of the findings from a 20 year study of pundit’s predications. The author argues that a successful pundit is not the pundit who makes the most successful predictions. Instead, the most successful pundit is the most sensational one. What lessons does this have for educational research? Would we rather read the article that makes a grand prediction and solves all of the world’s problems, or the article that recognizes small flaws and makes minor suggestions?
1 Comment
16 years ago
The founder of Insideschools.org was named one of the most important New Yorkers concerned about education in New York Magazine (as you will notice, there are no TC people on the list (Michael Rebell made the list for law).  Why is this site so important? Why do they have such a high p...
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16 years ago
Take a look at the interesting tool created by Standard and Poor's. Using it, one can easily find how well different school districts are doing on state standardized tests and can get a visual depiction of a school's demographics. This information is marketed–in part–to parents who are moving into a new area. If someone took a look at my high school, would they think about moving to North Plainfield if they could afford not to?
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16 years ago
The Washington Post ran an interesting article (you may need to create a guest account to view content) about a school that “challenges the assumptions of every public and private school that measures success with test scores and prizes academic rigor. It is an educational anomaly in the super-competitive Washington area: The school day here is unscripted.”The Fairhaven School, based on the
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16 years ago
As Gary noted yesterday during our pre-Sachs lecture conversation, a lot of interesting educational programs take place outside of schools. New York Magazine ran a short article about the Nurse-Family Partnership a program that pairs experienced nurses with pregnant teenagers. The program in brief: “Pair nurses with impoverished first-time mothers when they're pregnant–before any parenting habits need to be unlearned–an...
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16 years ago
Richard A. Lanham, the author of The Economics of Attention: Style and Substance in the Age of Information and The Electronic Word: Democracy, Technology, and the Arts among many other titles, has a very interesting website called Rhetorica. I have not seen a personal/academic/publishing page like this before, but I find it compelling. Further, it is interesting that Lantham [and his wife] made the transition from very traditional academic roles [English at UCLA, Principal Editor at the UCLA Center for Medieval and Re...
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17 years ago
I came across the Columbia University Medical Center's Center for Education Research and Evaluation accidentally, but was interested in some of their projects. In particular, their Faculty Development page had a number of interesting projects on it. I liked their take on Classroom Teaching and their development ...
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17 years ago
When I was on the PES website, I stumbled across a group called IERG, or the Imaginative Educational Research Group. On their website, they describe their goal as: “Ultimately we want to help bring about a change in the way schooling is conceived, organized and practiced worldwide. The change we want to bring about may be broadly summarized as a transition from an industrial age school system to a post-industrial system: from a system that attempts to squeeze people and thoughts into standardized boxes, often to the detriment of originality and adaptability, to a system that enables the unusual and effective to flourish wherever possible."
3 Comments
17 years ago
The New York Times blurbed this article from the Harvard Business Review. The authors adapted it from their book Results. The citation is: "The Passive Aggressive Workplace," Harvard Business Review, Oct2005, Vol. 83 Issue 10, p82-92. It can be accessed through Educat.
17 years ago
I came across this in the Washington Post. "Of all the dangerous and dot-complex problems that American publishers face in the near future -- economic downturns, competition for leisure time, piracy -- perhaps the most explosive one could be libraries. Publishers and librarians are squaring off for a battle royal over the way electronic books and journals are lent out from libraries and over what constitutes fair use of written material."