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(First of all, hello! If I haven't met you yet, I'm a new summer intern here at the EdLab. Picture to come soon, hopefully. Looking forward to working with all of you...) As someone who's a little obsessed with amassing information (as I expect many of you may be as well), I've been spending some time lately checking out the resources surrounding President Obama's Open Government Initiative. For those of you who haven't been following this development, the project features a few newly created/redesigned websites that aim to provide the public with more opportunities to gain information about the workings of government or participate in an exchange of ideas. For example, a site called data.gov,which is centered around data sets published by government agencies, recovery.gov, for Recovery Act spending, as well as an opportunity recently announced for public citizens to brainstorm policy ideas. More resources available here. Despite a little skepticism on my part as to the extent to which data will actually be provided or policy ideas seriously considered, these kinds of resources definitely excite my inner researcher. Browsing through them, however, has also gotten me thinking about how well we've prepared the general public to take advantage of these kinds of resources.
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The Wireless Computer Watch Sure, it's a little bulky, and sure it's not exactly very pretty to look at, but it has Linux, built-in GPS, and a fiberglass-reinforced nylon/magnesium alloy case that can withstand almost anything.
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Barack Obama's resounding keynote speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention was his introduction to the American public and political scene. His message of togetherness, political accountability and individual responsibility made him an overnight sensation and a serious candidate for more prestigious office at a time when he was just a state senator from Illinois. The national convention was the ideal stage for a young (politically speaking) ambitious politician bent on perfecting the union. Th...
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As I sat watching the premiere of Hard Times at Douglass High, a few thoughts came to mind during and after the documentary. For starters, the entire documentary parallels the 1989 docudrama, Lean on Me, which starred Morgan Freeman as Joe Clarke, principal of Eastside High School in Paterson, New Jersey. The movie revolves around Clarke's efforts to save Eastside High from state takeover if students failed to pass the basic minimum skills test. There are eer...
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I'm the new guy. New to the city, new to graphic design, new to the EdLab. Nine months ago I left a lucrative but tedious job as an electrical contractor in my hometown of Seattle to relocate and study graphic design. After experiencing the American marvel that is New York City, I fear that I may never feel fully content in any other place but here... My first two weeks here at the EdLab have been positive leaps as well. What I've enjoyed most about my experience thus far has been the approachable, receptive nature of the program. I've worked on numerous projects already, from Ian's animation-heavy brainchild Future Imperfect to collaborating with Chia-Ling to brand and advertise an upcoming series of art exhibitions. I've been able to get a few bites of everything.
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Of the three branches of the U. S. government, the most interesting and reclusive is the judicial branch: the Supreme Court. The road one takes to warm a seat on the Supreme Court is one of the great mysteries of American government. Under the federal system, the Supreme Court is the last court of appeals. A decision by the Supreme Court is the final word on that matter, though Congress has occasionally passed laws in response to a Supreme Court decision. There are no constitutional or statutory qualifications for serving on the Supreme Court. Article III, Section I, of our constitution states...
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On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Morse v. Frederick that school administrators can take necessary action against students whose actions are deemed inappropriate on school grounds. In his opinion for the court, Chief Justice John Roberts stated “we hold that schools may take steps to safeguard those entrusted to their care from speech that can reasonably be regarded as encouraging illegal drug use. We conclude that the school officials in this case did not violate the First Amendment by confiscating the pro-drug banner and suspending the student responsible for it.” The issue at h...
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