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Did you know that American politician, educator, and author Shirley Anita Chisholm (nee St Hill) was also an alumna of Teachers College, Columbia University? Chisholm earned her MA in elementary education here in 1952, while serving as a teacher's aide in a Harlem nursery school. Following her degree she directed the Friends Day Nursery in Brownsville, Brooklyn -- becoming recognized for her work in early childhood education and welfar...
Published by John Murray of London, England, on November 24, 1859, Charles Darwin’s
Why find highly cited articles and authors? Is it helpful to see who has cited you or is writing on the same topic? Or are you just curious about the most cited scholarly journals with a view to publishing your own?A number of databases provide the means of determining where a particular work or ...
On November 17th, 1558, Elizabeth Tudor at the age of 25 years succeeded her half-sister Queen Mary, to the throne of England. Daughters to the exuberant King Henry VIII, Mary was brought up as Catholic and became known for her efforts to reverse the English Reformation, while Elizabeth, was raised as Protestant and lent wittiness and temper to her strong-willed personality. Nicknamed the "Virgin Queen" or "Good Queen Bess," ...
On November 11th, 1852, American writer Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832- March 6, 1888) published her first short story, The Rival Painters: A Story of Rome, in what many believe, The Saturday Evening Gazette; it tells of two painters who fall for the same woman. With love as a central theme in her work, Alcott would b...
How do you find funding to support your research, special project, studies, travel, or other initiative? Although it may seem like a daunting task to find a grantor, the reality is that money is out there, and folks want to give it away (for good purposes)! This blog covers the do's of grant seeking.Fo...
On November 4th, 2004, the Gottesman Libraries of Teachers College, Columbia University were dedicated at a ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by students, faculty, and staff who lined Main (now Zankel) Hall and filled the hand-painted, arched library atrium. Donors Sandy and Ruth Gottesman ma...
Across the city New Yorkers stand eager and compliant -- masked, separated by six feet, and determined to make it all count, correctly. As voters head to the polls in what may be cast the Election Of The Century, we take stock: 7:30am and already a neighborly wait with relatively long lines up the block. We move slowly towards the school, like inchworms to a leafy field in Autumn. Steady pace, punctuated by brief conversation and hopeful thinking -- to better, healthier, perhaps more hallowed ground -- in what has been a record period of devastating global pandemic, political prote...
On October 27th, 1904, New York City's first underground subway line opened, addressing the need to alleviate street congestion while offering rapid transportation to the public. Construction began in 1900, with digging done at night by men, mostly immigrants, using pickaxes and lanterns. Operated by Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT), the first train ran a little over nine miles, from City Hall in Brooklyn, to 145th Street and Broa...
Did you know that influential American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer John Dewey was born this day, October 20th, 1859 in Burlington, Vermont? The third of fourth sons to Archibald Dewey and Lucia Artemisia Rich, John Dewey attended public schools in his hometown before enrolling at the age of 15 years at the University of Vermont. He went on to earn a doctorate from Johns Hopkins University in 1884, after ...