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Jun 21 2019 - 09:06 AM
Teachers College Historical Portraiture - Restored Oil Paintings

Teachers College Historical Portraitures


Restored Oil Paintings -- Mar 21st - June 6th, 2016




The Teachers College Historic Portraits are part of a collection depicting faculty and significant figures from TC’s past. With generous support from the Myers  Foundation, the artwork has been masterfully restored by Chelsea Restoration Associates, and is now gathered together for the first time for public viewing.

William Chandler Bagley


William Chandler Bagley



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Portrait of William Chandler Bagley



William Chandler Bagley was born March 15, 1874, in Detroit, Michigan. Bagley attended high school in Detroit and in 1891 enrolled in the Michigan Agricultural College (now Michigan State University) to study scientific agriculture. He received his bachelor's degree in 1895, but finding no immediate employment in his field, he took a position as a teacher in a one-room school in the town of Garth, a lumber community in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

His interest in teaching was awakened with this experience, and in the summer of 1896 he began studies at the University of Chicago in the field of education and learning theory. Then, after a second year teaching at Garth, he enrolled as a full-time student, on borrowed money, at the University of Wisconsin, completing his master's degree in 1898. He then began work toward a doctorate in education and psychology at Cornell University, studying with Edward Bradford Titchener, a leading laboratory psychologist at that time. He completed the Ph.D. degree in 1900 with a dissertation entitled "The Apperception of the Spoken Sentence."

Bagley's first faculty appointment was in 1902 at the Montana State Normal College at Dillon as professor of psychology and pedagogy and director of teacher training. He also served as superintendent of the local Dillon public schools, where he promoted such innovations as the use of college student teachers in the schools. After several years there and in a similar faculty appointment at the State Normal School in Oswego, New York, in 1909 Bagley was appointed professor and director of the School of Education at the University of Illinois. During this period of expansion of American schools and of teacher education institutions, Bagley worked to create a strong faculty and to build an influential program in education at the University of Illinois. In 1917 he left Illinois to accept a professorship at Teachers College, Columbia University, in New York City. There he organized a department for the study of normal schools and teacher education. He continued in this position at Teachers College until his retirement in 1939.

WWW.ENCYCLOPEDIA.COM/TOPIC/WILLIAM_CHANDLER_BAGLEY.ASPX


Photography



A Book titled "William Chandler Bagley Stalwart Educator" authored by I. L. Kandel Where Teachers College Library Columbia University


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James Earl Russell


James Earl Russell



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Peter William Dykema


Peter William Dykema



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Edward Thorndike


Edward Thorndike



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Portrait of Edward Lee Thorndike



Dr. Edward Lee Thorndike made his greatest contribution in scientific research, which influenced the method and practice in elementary and secondary education.

The celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of Professor E. L. Thorndike's connection with Teachers College was marked by the dinner given for his family, students, and friends, at the Faculty Club in February, 1926, and by the special issue of the TEACHERS COLLEGE RECORD for February of that year, containing a bibliography of his works. The last permanent item in this occasion of recognition is the hanging in Teachers College of his portrait, which was unveiled on February 16, 1928.

The portrait is the work of the distinguished painter, Wayman Adams. It shows Dr. Thorndike in academic dress in a sitting position. The use of color in the background gives life and verve to the picture. No painter could hope to convey to the full the dynamic personality that Teachers College has known for these twenty-five years, but Mr. Adams has brought unusual understanding to his task, and has achieved an artistic success as well as a satisfying likeness. The portrait is hung in the lobby of the second floor of Russell Hall, near the psychology division of the library.

The unveiling took place in the presence of a group of friends and faculty of Teachers College. The presentation was made by Dr. John J. Coss of Columbia University on behalf of the friends and students who had planned for the portrait to be painted. Dean William F. Russell accepted the gift in the name of Teachers College in a speech of affectionate recognition of the influence of Dr. Thorndike in the life of the College and of his position among educators and psychologists.

FROM TEACHERS COLLEGE RECORD VOLUME 29 NUMBER 8, 1928, P. 739-752 HTTP://WWW.TCRECORD.ORG ID NUMBER: 5768


FATHER OF MODERN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY



Edward Lee Thorndike was a psychologist who spent nearly his entire career at Teachers College, Columbia University. His work on Comparative psychology and the learning process led to the theory of connectionism and helped lay the scientific foundation for modern educational psychology. He also worked on solving industrial problems, such as employee exams and testing.

EDWARD THORNDIKE. (2016, MARCH 12). IN WIKIPEDIA, THE FREE ENCYCLOPEDIA. RETRIEVED 18:48, MARCH 30, 2016, FROM https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Edward_Thorndike&oldid=713099317


"THORNDIKE'S PUZZLE BOX" - TC 125TH ANNIVERSARY ARCHIVAL FOOTAGE SHOWCASE.


George Strayer


George Strayer



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Portrait of George Strayer



Was a leader in school administration at Teachers College, Columbia University, George D. Strayer, along with Robert M. Haig, is best known as the originator of the Stayer-Haig plan, which has served as the basic formula for states to make general grants of aid to school districts on an equalized basis.

Strayer (1876–1962) started his long career in education with an interest in classroom teaching, specifically in the area of mathematics, and he came to be regarded as a founding light in the new field of educational administration. An alumnus of Columbia, he studied at Teachers College at a time when it was the heralded breeding ground and center of a new, empirically based, progressive educational philosophy. As head of the division of field studies at Teachers College for over 20 years (1921–1942), Strayer also served as director of the Division of Organization and Administration of Education at Teachers College from 1937 to 1942. His national reputation led to service with numerous respected organizations, among these the presidency of the National Education Association.

HTTP://SK.SAGEPUB.COM/REFERENCE/EDLEADERSHIP/N542.XML?PAGENUM=968


DOCUMENTATION



Newspaper Article Commemorating Death of George D. Strayer

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George D. Strayer completes service at Teachers College

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Norval Luther Church


Norval Luther Church



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Mary Swartz Rose


Mary Swartz Rose



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William Heard Kilpatrick


William Heard Kilpatrick



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PORTRAIT OF WILLIAM HEARD KILPATRICK



William Heard Kilpatrick, Professor of Education, 1911-1938

At The time of his retirement from active service in the faculty of Teachers College (1937), hundreds of Dr. William H. Kilpatrick's friends, including students, colleagues, and many others, gratefully joined resources to present a portrait of him to Teachers College. This likeness of the distinguished educator hangs now in the library of the College.

From the funds gathered on that occasion there was an amount over and above that needed for the portrait. Professor Kilpatrick, in conference with the Fund Committee, was pleased that this residue should become the permanent basis for an award which would give further stimulus to the great cause which his own career had so brilliantly advanced. The fund accordingly was put into the possession of the Trustees of Teachers College and there was thus established by the College the William Heard Kilpatrick Award for Distinguished Service in Philosophy of Education. A committee appointed for the purpose studies the field and every two years selects a person to recommend as the recipient of this Award.

TEACHERS COLLEGE RECORD VOLUME 49 NUMBER 4, 1948, P. 250-262


KILPATRICK COLLECTION



Dr.William Heard Kilpatrick is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and education at Teachers College, Columbia University where he taught from 1912 – 1937. He is considered one of the most popular professors ever at Teachers College having taught more than 35,000 students during his tenure. As a highly effective proponent of progressive education, advocating project-based learning, curriculum learning, and whole child education, Kilpatrick completed his bachelor’s degree at Mercer University in 1891.

He undertook graduate study in mathematics at Johns Hopkins University and in 1897, Mercer University offered him a faculty position in mathematics and astronomy. He later served as acting president of the school from 1903–1905

Kilpatrick’s immensely popular article “The Project Method” (1918) made him well known among educators throughout the United States. This approach focuses on the interests of children, which advocates that by using their interests as units of study, learning becomes more relevant and meaningful. His most prominent book Foundations of Method (1925) became a widely used textbook in education courses nationwide.

In addition to teaching and writing, Kilpatrick engaged in a variety of other endeavors related to the promotion of progressive education principles. A cofounder of Bennington (VT) College, he served as president of its board of trustees from 1931–1938. He also formed the Kilpatrick Discussion Group with several other Teachers College faculty members, which met from its inception through World War II. Kilpatrick was a founding member of the John Dewey Society in 1935 and served as the organization’s leader until 1957. He edited the Society’s first yearbook The Teacher and Society (1937) and co edited its ninth yearbook Intercultural Attitudes in the Making (1947). He taught part time during his first years of retirement, and remained an author and editor. Likewise, he was involved in civil rights causes—a rarity for a Southerner of his generation.

HTTP://POCKETKNOWLEDGE.TC.COLUMBIA.EDU/HOME.PHP/BROWSE/32527BROWSEBY=CHART&SORTFILES=VOLUME&OPTDISPLAY=0


DYNAMIC LEARNING



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http://pocketknowledge.tc.columbia.edu/home.php/viewfile/27193


Dr. Kilpatrick sets forth some of the principles underlying creative or progressive education. He develops the idea that the child’s learning must be related to real life situations. Methods by which this dynamic learning can be fostered are illustrated in actual classroom scenes. Encyclopedia Britannica, (1931)

This film clip shows Professor Kilpatrick demonstrate in a classroom what he thinks "To Learn" means. He speaks about academic learning as well as what he refers to as "home learning". Kilpatrick believes that the child is an active participant - that learning is active and dynamic.



Dr. John Fischer


John Fischer



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PORTRAIT OF JOHN FISCHER



John H. Fischer, TC's sixth president and also a former dean of the College, passed away in late December at the age of 99. Fischer served as TC's president from 1962 through 1974. A former elementary school teacher, guidance counselor and vice principal, he came to national attention through his enforcement of desegregation as the superintendent of Baltimore city schools, a post he had assumed in 1953.


During his brief tenure in that role, he changed the entrance level grade to the college from a B minus to at least a B average, granting few exceptions to students who did not meet the criteria. He also changed the academic standards in courses and papers, and stiffened the final oral examination on doctoral projects. All of these changes helped position Teachers College as a leader in the educational field.


One of Fischer's goals when he assumed the presidency at TC in 1962 was to give greater attention to problems in the urban education sector -- specifically to inner-city schools in New York. During his tenure, TC established the Institute for Urban and Minority Education (IUME), as well as the Institute of International Studies. Fischer also served as member and chair of the National Commission on the Education of the Disadvantaged and the National Advisory Commission on Education of Disadvantaged Children from 1965 to 1969.


Fischer also was a major supporter of TC’s work in building an education system in Afghanistan, making one and sometimes two trips to Kabul himself each year.


HTTP://WWW.TC.COLUMBIA.EDU/NEWSROOM/ARTICLES/2009/DECEMBER/JOHN-FISCHER-FORMER-TC-PRESIDENT-PASSES-AWAY/

DOCUMENTATION



Desegregating City Schools Rough Draft by John H. Fischer

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John H. Fischer, in 1964. Credit Carl T. Gossett/the New York Times: HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/2009/12/26/EDUCATION/26FISCHER.HTML?_R=0

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Dr. Fischer is Selected Head of Teachers College:

HTTP://SEARCH.PROQUEST.COM/DOCVIEW/542456860/FULLTEXTPDF/62930173C68F4BF4PQ/1?ACCOUNTID=10226

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The School Park by John H. Fischer

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RESUME



In a December 1965 address to the Governor’s Conference on Education in Salt Lake City, Utah, Fischer also spoke out in defense of individual creative and imagination.


“In a world increasingly preoccupied with the problems of organization, of collectivism, of mass responses to mass media, it becomes more important than ever that education serve as countervailing influence on the side of individuality,” he said. “To look upon imagination only as one of the more charming qualities of childhood would be to denigrate the clear evidence that it is essential to all creative or critical ability.”


Fischer taught at many universities during his long career, including Harvard, Johns Hopkins (where he was also a trustee of the College), Duke, the University of Chicago, Emory and the University of Maryland. He served as a consultant to what was then the U.S. Office of Education, as well as to the Department of State and the Carnegie, Ford and Kellogg Foundations, among many others. He earned his undergraduate degree at Johns Hopkins University and his doctorate from Teachers College.

Patty Smith Hill


Patty Smith Hill



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Paul Monroe


Paul Monroe



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Lyman Bryson


Lyman Bryson



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PORTRAIT OF LYMAN BRYSON



Lyman Bryson, Professor of Education, 1935-1953

Born in Valentine, Nebraska, and educated at the University of Michigan, Bryson was a frequent guest on the radio game show Information, Please. Bryson served as a professor at Teachers College, Columbia University from 1934 to 1953. 

Bryson chaired the Adult Education Board for CBS Radio, moderating such programs as The American School of the Air and Invitation to Learning. From 1938 to 1946 he hosted the public affairs program, The People's Platform, which was adapted for television (1948–1950). Bryson died November 24, 1959, at age 71.
Lyman Lloyd Bryson (July 11, 1888 – November 24, 1959) was an American educator, media advisor and author known for his work in educational radio and television programs for CBS from the 1930s through the 1950s. 



LYMAN BRYSON. (2016, MARCH 23). IN WIKIPEDIA, THE FREE ENCYCLOPEDIA.
RETRIEVED 17:58, APRIL 11, 2016, FROM HTTPS://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/W/INDEX.PHP?TITLE=LYMAN_BRYSON&OLDID=711463299



ARTIST HOWARD SIMON (1902 - 1979)



Howard Simon, born in New York City, was a book illustrator, etcher, painter, and water colorist. He studied at the National Academy of Design and with Jacques Alexander at the Académie Julian in Paris, He also learned woodblock technique from Japanese instructors. When Simon and his wife returned to the United States in 1928, they first lived in San Francisco, California, and subsequently moved to Hollis, Arkansas. They divided their time between Arkansas and New York City, where Simon served on the faculty of New York University. His Arkansas work consisted primarily of woodcuts and etchings, and was exhibited at the Smithsonian and in other major institutions both here and abroad. Simon was a full member of the California Society of Etchers. He illustrated many books for his wives and for others throughout his career. In 1971, Simon joined the faculty of the Barlow School in Amenia, New York, and became the chairman of the art department in 1972. He died in White Plains New York.

HTTP://BRIERHILLGALLERY.COM/HOWARD-SIMON/



Lucetta Daniell


Lucetta Daniell



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PORTRAIT OF LUCETTA DANIELL



A portrait of Miss Lucetta Daniell, retiring Welfare Director of Teachers College, now hangs in the Grace Dodge Room. It was presented April 21 at a gathering of members of the Board of Trustees, the faculty, and the staff of Teachers College, and others of Miss Daniell's friends. The address of presentation was made by Mrs. Juliana Haskell, adviser to graduate women students at Columbia University and chairman of the committee which arranged for the portrait to be painted. Responses were made by Dean Russell and President Butler, and the portrait was accepted by Mr. Cleveland E. Dodge, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Teachers College.


The artist, H. E. Ogden-Campbell, has caught very skillfully the inspiration of his subject's personality, and the portrait will serve in years to come as a welcome reminder of Miss Daniell.


HTTP://TINYURL.COM/POCKETKNOWLEDGE

DOCUMENTATION



Portrait of Mrs. B. R. Andrews and Miss Lucetta Daniell, Teachers College. (1916)

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Portrait of Miss Lucetta Daniell, Teachers College. (May 1915)

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Before restoration 

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ARTIST H. E. OGDEN-CAMPBELL 1879-1964




Helena Eastman Ogden Campbell, was a distinguished painter and Wesleyan alumna, and by friends in her New York and European artistic milieu; the Wesleyan collection remains a testament to her commitment to painting and collecting and her leadership in the New York arts community.

HTTP://WWW.WESLEYANCOLLEGE.EDU/ACADEMICS/CENTERS/MASTERWORKS.CFM

HTTPS://ISSUU.COM/WESLEYANCOLLEGE/DOCS/CAMPBELLN







Franklin Thomas Baker


Franklin Thomas Baker




Lawrence A. Cremin


Lawrence A. Cremin




William Fletcher Russell


William Fletcher Russell



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Portrait of William Fletcher Russell



William Fletcher Russell, Dean of Teachers College 1927-1949, President of Teachers College 1949 

Dean of Teachers College 1927-1949, President of Teachers College 1949 - 1954

Miss Carney outlined what she hoped to do in Africa, the places she expected to visit there, and how she would try to bring back to her work here knowledge and inspiration from Africa. She told of the activities of the Teachers College Club in South Africa and displayed a beautifully enlarged photograph of Dean Russell's recent portrait which she is carrying as a gift from Teachers College to the club in Cape Town.

Dr. Will Russell, in the name of the International Institute, wished Miss Carney success in her mission to Africa. Dr. Russell humorously dwelt upon Miss Carney's many activities, showing her appreciation of the unique service of Teachers College and her broad interest in all departments of the institution.

Tribute by Hollis L. Caswell to Wiiliam F Russell,  Teachers College Record Volume 27 Number 7, 1926, p. 643-643 

PHOTOGRAPHY



Portrait of William Fletcher Russell, 1890-1956, Teachers College. (Date Not Known), Photographer: Kaiden Kazajian

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Portrait of William Fletcher Russell, 1890-1956, Teachers College. (Date Not Known), Photographer: Kaiden Kazajian

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William Fletcher Russell, 1890-1956. Teachers College. (CA. 1937), Printmaker: Unknown

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ARTIST ELIE CRISTO‐LOVEANU



Elie Cristo‐Loveanu, was an artist and educator who painted por­traits of past Presidents such as Dwight D. Eisenhower and Her­bert Hoover.


Cristo-Loveanu was an adjunct professor of Ro­mance languages at Columbia University since 1942. Though he is best known for his work in art. He was also a professor of fine arts at Lazar College in Bucharest and an instructor at New York University before joining the Columbia faculty.


“In February, 1951, Co­lumbia University held its annual faculty art exhibition, General Eisen­hower, on leave from the uni­versity, was represented only by the portrait that Mr. Cristo­Loveanu had painted. Before that, the general had always exhibited paintings that he had done himself.”


WWW.NYTIMES.COM/1964/04/29/ELIE-CRISTOLOVEANU-70-DIES.HTML?_R=0



Hollis Leland Caswell


Hollis Leland Caswell



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PORTRAIT OF HOLLIS LELAND CASWELL



Dr. Hollis Leland Caswell was the Dean of Teachers College 1949-1954, and President of Teachers College 1954-1962. He was an authority on curriculum planning in directed surveys of curriculum practices in several school systems, and wrote several books on the subject.


During his presidency the college launched a twenty-year collaboration with schools in Afghanistan, and mounted a volunteer program for teachers to various nations in Africa.


In the years after World War II, Dr. Caswell opposed efforts to develop a standard national curriculum for public schools, arguing instead for more differentiation in teaching methods. He called for strengthening university centers that influence curriculums and teacher training.


In the two decades before his retirement, Dr. Caswell was a principal editorial adviser to the World Book Encyclopedia, published by Field Enterprises. He also was a consultant to many state education departments and municipal school systems and held a number of high positions in national educational organizations, including the National Education Association and the

American Council on Education.


HOLLIS CASWELL. (2016, APRIL 18). IN WIKIPEDIA, THE FREE ENCYCLOPEDIA. RETRIEVED 16:01, JUNE 3, 2016, FROM


HTTPS://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/W/INDEX.PHP?TITLE=HOLLIS_CASWELL&OLDID=715800136


HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/1988/11/24/OBITUARIES/DR-HOLLIS-L-CASWELL-87-IS-DEAD-EX-PRESIDENT-OF-TEACHERS-COLLEGE.HTML

DOCUMENTATION




ARTIST ELIE CRISTO‐LOVEANU



Elie Cristo‐Loveanu, was an artist and educator who painted por­traits of past Presidents such as Dwight D. Eisenhower and Her­bert Hoover.


Cristo-Loveanu was an adjunct professor of Ro­mance languages at Columbia University since 1942. Though he is best known for his work in art. He was also a professor of fine arts at Lazar College in Bucharest and an instructor at New York University before joining the Columbia faculty.


“In February, 1951, Co­lumbia University held its annual faculty art exhibition, General Eisen­hower, on leave from the uni­versity, was represented only by the portrait that Mr. Cristo-­Loveanu had painted. Before that, the general had always exhibited paintings that he had done himself.”


WWW.NYTIMES.COM/1964/04/29/ELIE-CRISTOLOVEANU-70-DIES.HTML?_R=0

Mary DeGarmo Bryan


Mary DeGarmo Bryan



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Florence Nightingale


Florence Nightingale



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PORTRAIT OF FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE



Florence Nightingale, was a pioneer of modern nursing and a noted humanitarian.


Was a celebrated English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modern nursing.
She came to prominence while serving as a manager of nurses trained by her during the Crimean War, where she organized the tending to wounded soldiers. She gave nursing a highly favourable reputation and became an icon of Victorian culture, especially in the persona of "The Lady with the Lamp" making rounds of wounded soldiers at night.

https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Florence_Nightingale&oldid=724147653




DOCUMENTATION



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ARTIST FREDERICK ROCHER



Frederick Rocher; Painter of Popes and Princesses Comes To Interpret the American Beauty: Frederick Rocher, Created Cavalier by Benedict XV., Would Find the Soul of Our "Vivid Figures, Flat and Boyish That Do Not Look Like Motherhood."
San Francisco Chronicle (1869-Current File) [San Francisco, Calif] 29 Oct 1922: SM13.
http://ezproxy.cul.columbia.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.cul.columbia.edu/docview/575138821?accountid=10226




|By: Zoe Logan|806 Reads